Baseballs Steroid Era - News, Lists, Timelines, Quotes, Statistics

Baseball's Steroid Era

Extensive steroids in baseball news archive and resources including lists (players, drugs, suspensions), quotes, timelines, statistics, articles, affidavits, transcripts, books, video and more.

Wednesday, August 09, 2006

List of Players Linked to Steroids and/or Human Growth Hormone

The information in this list summarizes news reports linking these players to steroids, steroid precursors, human growth hormone, or other drugs banned by MLB (excluding amphetamines).

Use the links below to jump to an explanation of each player's involvement in the steroid era. In the Mitchell Report section, the page number refers to the page in the report that describes the evidence concerning each player. The number in parentheses is the page number in the PDF version available online.

For the most up-to-date and detailed list, see Baseball's Steroid Era's Players Linked to Steroids and Human Growth Hormone (HGH).


Mitchell Report

Ricky Bones - Page 92-94 (140-142)

In 2000, the a clubhouse attendant with the Florida Marlins found a bag belonging to Bones that contained "over two dozen syringes, six vials of injectable medications - stanozolol and nandrolone decanoate, two anabolic steroids that are sold under the names Winstrol and Deca-Durabolin, respectively – and a page of handwritten instructions on how to administer the drugs." Bones was required to speak to the Mitchell Investigation as he was an employee of the New York Mets. During his interview, Bones acknowledged the incident stating that the drugs were prescribed for him by a doctor in his native Puerto Rico.

Alex Cabrera - Page 94 (142)

In September 2001, a clubhouse employee with the Arizona Diamondbacks found a package with "a bottle of anabolic steroids (Winstrol) and several hundred (diet) pills" that had been mailed to the Diamondbacks stadium and addressed to Cabrera. Arizona General Manager Joe Joe Garagiola, Jr. reported the incident to the Commissioner’s Office. By the time the DEA confirmed the bottle contained anabolic steroids, Cabrera's contract had been sold to a Japanese Team.

Larry Bigbie - Page 152 (200)

Bigbie was a customer of convicted Steroid Dealer, Kirk Radomski, and cooperated with the Mitchell Investigation after calling Radomski for performance enhancing drugs while the government monitored the call. Bigbe admitted using a wide array of performance-enhancing drugs including anabolic steroids (Deca-Durabolin, testosterone, and Sustanon), human growth hormone and anti-estrogen drugs.

Jack Cust - Page 159 (207)

Cust was implicated in the Mitchell Investigation by Larry Bigbie. Bigbie said that Cust asked him if he had ever done steroids to which Bigbie said he had. Cust said that he had as well. According to Bigbie, Cust also said that he had a source that could get anything he wanted. Cust declined the opportunity to respond.

Tim Laker - Page 159 (207)

Laker was a customer of convicted Steroid Dealer, Kirk Radomski. As a current club employee, Laker was required to cooperate with the Mitchell Investigation. Laker admitted to using anabolic steroids (testosterone) purchased from Radomski between 1995 and 1999.

Josias Manzanillo - Page 161 (209)

Manzanillo was linked to Kirk Radomski in the Mitchell Report. Radomski claims to have personally injected Manzanillo with Deca-Durabolin (provided by Manzanillo) but said he never sold any drugs to him. Radomski said he remembers it very clearly because it was the only time he ever actually saw a MLB player using steroids. Mananilla on the other hand said that he was approached several times by Radomski while he was an employ of the New York Mets and encouraged to use and buy steroids. Through his lawyer, Manzanillo said that he purchased one cycle of steroids but “chickened out or thought better of it” before ever using them.

Todd Hundley - Page 163 (211)

As part of the Mitchell Investigation, convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski, said he sold anabolic steroids (Deca-Durabolin and testosterone) to Hundley early in 1996. Radomski said he told Hundley that if he used steroids he would hit 40 home runs. That year Hundley hit 41. His previous high was 16.

Mark Carreon - Page 163 (211)

Carreon reportedly knew Kirk Radomski from when both were employed by the New York Mets. Radomski told the Mitchell Investigation that he provided Carreon with anabolic steroids (Dianabol) at some point between 1994 and 1996 when Carreon was with the San Francisco Giants.

Hal Morris - Page 164 (212)

Morris was a customer of convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski. Radomski told Mitchell investigators that he sold anabolic steroids (Deca-Durabolin and testosterone) Morris in 1999 when Morris was with the Cincinnati Reds.

Matt Franco - Page 165 (213)

Convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski, told the Mitchell Investigation that he sold Franco anabolic steroids on one occasion in 2000. Franco denied ever knowing Radomski and stated that he had never used or purchased any performance enhancing drugs.

Rondell White - Page 165 (213)

White made at least 7 purchases of performance enhancing drugs from convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski beginning in 2000. According to the Mitchell Report, White bought anabolic steroids (Deca-Durabolin) and human growth hormone (HGH) and left a paper trail of 7 checks made out to Radomski and a Fed Ex

Chuck Knobloch - Page 175 (223)

According to the Mitchell Report, Knobloch made several purchases of human growth hormone (HGH) from convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski, beginning in 2001. Radomski said Knobloch made payments through former strength and conditioning coach, Brian McNamee, or Jason Grimsley. McNamee, as part of his cooperation with the investigation, confirmed that he acquired HGH for knobloch and that he personally injected Knobloch “at least seven to nine times.”

Gregg Zaun - Page 179 (227)

Convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski, told Mitchell investigators that he sold Zaun anabolic steroids (Deca-Durabolin and Winstrol) and produced a check to corroborate payment. Also, former Montreal Expos bullpen catcher, Luis Perez, told the Commissioner’s office in 2003 (after he had been arrested for marijuana possession) that he supplied Zaun and 7 other players with steroids.

David Justice - Page 181 (229)

Justice reportedly made a single purchase of “two or three kits” of human growth hormone (HGH) from convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski, in late 2000 or early 2001. Former strength coach, Brian McNamee, told Mitchell investigators that Justice admitted to McNamee that he had obtained HGH from Radomski. Justice had already been interviewed by Mitchell before they acquired the evidence from Radomski and McNamee. Justice reportedly denied ever using any performance-enhancing drugs and named “many” players that he suspected had used steroids. Justice emphasized he had no direct knowledge of use by those players.

F.P. Santangelo - Page 182 (230)

Convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski, told Mitchell investigators that believed Santangelo had been referred to him by David Segui. Radomski said he sold anabolic steroids (Deca-Durabolin and testosterone) and human growth hormone (HGH) to Santangelo. Also, Adam Piatt told Mitchell investigators that Santangelo had referred him to Radomski after Piatt had asked where he could get performance enhancing drugs.

Glenallen Hill - Page 183 (231)

Convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski told Mitchell investigators that he sold Hill human growth hormone in 2001 after sending Hill a “sample bottle” free of charge. Radomski also said that Hill referred Mo Vaughn to him in 2001. As a current team employee, Hill was required to talk to investigators. Hill said that he bought anabolic steroids (Sustanon) from Radomski but never used them. Both men admitted to at least 5 conversations about performance-enhancing drugs around 2000.

Mo Vaughn - Page 186 (234)

Vaughn reportedly bought human growth hormone (HGH) from Kirk Radomski leaving behind 3 checks made out to Radomski beginning in 2001. Radomski told investigators that he never sold Vaughn any anabolic steroids because Vaughn was “afraid of the big needles.”

Denny Neagle - Page 187 (235)

Convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski told Mitchell investigators that he sold Neagle anabolic steroids and human growth hormone “five or six” times between 2000 and 2004. Radomski produced 8 checks from or on behalf of Neagle as well as several telephone numbers and an address marked “Col. Rockies Clubhouse” in Radomski’s address book.

Ron Villone - Page 188 (236)

Villone was referred to Kirk Radomski by Denny Neagle according to Radomski. According to the Mitchell report, Radomski sold Villone human growth hormone on three occasions from 2004 to 2005. Villone also called Radomski in mid-June 2006 looking for more HGH. Radomski told investigators that he told Villone he didn’t have any to sell.

Chris Donnels - Page 190 (238)

Donnels reportedly met convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski while Donnels played with the New York Mets (and Radomski was clubhouse attendant) in 1991 and 1992. Radomski told Mitchell investigators that he sold Donnels anabolic steroids (Deca-Durabolin, Dianabol, and testosterone) and human growth hormone on at least 8 occasions from 2000 to 2004. Donnels cooperated with the investigation after being contacted saying he expected to hear from them. Donnels gave a very detailed account from his first conversations about steroids with Ken Caminiti as early as 1993 to his own use of drugs over the years.

Todd Williams - Page 194 (242)

Convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski told Mitchell investigators that he sold anabolic steroids (Winstrol) to Williams in 2001. There was no corroborating evidence mentioned.

Phil Hiatt - Page 194 (242)

According to the Mitchell Report, Kirk Radomski said that he sold Hiatt anabolic steroids (Deca-Durabolin) and human growth hormone on “two or three occasions” after they met in 2001. Radomski said he sent a package to the Los Angeles Dodgers stadium for Hiatt as well as to two other addresses.

Todd Pratt - Page 195 (243)

Pratt was reportedly one of Kirk Radomski’s customers. Radomski told Mitchell investigators that he sold Pratt anabolic steroids twice adding that Pratt told him he had aquired steroids (Deca-Durabolin) from another source previously.

Kevin Young - Page 195 (243)

Convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski told Mitchell investigators that he sold Young human growth hormone on two occasions, first after the 200 season and again in 2003. Several phone numbers for Young were found in Radomski’s address book.

Mike Lansing - Page 196 (244)

Lansing was referred to Kirk Radomski by David Segui according to Radomski. Radomski told Mitchell investigators that he had 4 to 5 transactions with Lansing wherein he purchased testosterone and human growth hormone. Radomski said Lansing was familiar testosterone and “knew exactly what he wanted.” Phone numbers, addresses and money orders were found linking Lansing to Radomski.

Cody McKay - Page 197 (245)

Convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski, told Mitchell investigators that he sold McKay steroids on at least two occasions. Investigators found McKays’s name, phone number and an address for the Indianapolis Indians (where McKay played in 2003) under his entry in Radomski’s address book.

Kent Mercker - Page 198 (246)

Convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski, told Mitchell investigators that he sold Mercker one kit of human growth hormone in October 2002. The report cited a check and an Express Mail receipt corroborating Radomski’s side of the story.

Adam Piatt - Page 199 (247)

Piatt, through his lawyer, contacted the Mitchell Investigation after Kirk Radomski’s guilty pleas was announced. Piatt, saying he was referred to Radomski by F.P. Santangelo, detailed years of using anabolic steroids (Deca-Durabolin or testosterone) and human growth hormone. Radomski produced 8 check made out to him from Piatt. Mitchell said Piatt should be “commended for his candor, for his willingness to admit that he made a mistake, and for accepting responsibility for his actions.”

Jason Christiansen - Page 205 (253)

Convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski, told Mitchell investigators that he sold Christiansen a single kit of human growth hormone in 2002. Radomski provided a check made out to him from Christiansen of $1600.

Mike Stanton - Page 205 (253)

Convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski, told Mitchell investigators that he sold Stanton human growth hormone on two occasions in 2003. Radomski produced one check and stated that Stanton paid in cash the other time.

Stephen Randolph - Page 206 (254)

Randolph was referred to Kirk Radomski by Chris Donnels according to Radomski. Radomski told Mitchell investigators that he sold Randolph human growth hormone at least one time in 2003 or 2004. Randolph’s name, address and phone number were found in Radomski’s address book.

Paul Lo Duca - Page 208 (256)

Convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski, told Mitchell investigators that he sold Lo Duca “performance enhancing drugs” on at least six occasions. Only human growth hormone was mentioned by in reference to checks and notes written by Lo Duca to Radomski. Investigators found Lo Duca’s name, address and telephone number in Radomski’s address book.

Adam Riggs - Page 211 (259)

Riggs was referred to Kirk Radomski by Paul Lo Duca according to Radomski. Radomski told Mitchell investigators that he sold Riggs anabolic steroids (Winstrol), human growth hormone and clenbuterol. Radomski produced five checks/money orders made out to Radomski from Riggs. Riggs name, phone number and address were found in Radomski’s address book.

Bart Miadich - Page 212 (260)

Kirk Radomski told Mitchell investigators that Miadich was referred to him by Adam Riggs. Radomski described Miadich as a frequent purchaser of small quantities of anabolic steroids (Winstrol and testosterone) from 2002 to 2005. Radomski also indicated that Miadich was getting human growth hormone from a different source. Former teammate and admitted steroid user, Chad Allen, told Mitchell investigators that Miadich’s body mass and definition, along with skin tightness and “roid rage” indicated to hm that he was using steroids.

Fernando Vina - Page 213 (261)

Vina reportedly knew Kirk Radomski from when Vina was a minor league player in the New York Mets system. Radomski told the Mitchell Investigation that he provided Vina with anabolic steroids(Deca-Durabolin and Winstrol) and human growth hormone to Vina from 6 to 8 times between 2000 and 2005. Radomski produced three checks from Vina and Vina’s name, address, and phone number were found in Radomski’s address book.

Kevin Brown - Page 214 (262)

Brown was referred to Kirk Radomski by Paul Lo Duca according to Radomski. Radomski told Mitchell investigators that Brown was very knowledgable about HGH before Radomski sold Brown anabolic steroids (Deca-Durabolin) and human growth hormone 5 or 6 times after 2001. Investigators seized an Express Mail receipt from 2004 addressed to Brown with his address. Brown’s name, address, and phone number were found in Radomski’s address book.

Eric Gagne - Page 217 (265)

Gagne was referred to Kirk Radomski by Paul Lo Duca according to Radomski. Radomski said he sold Gagne human growth hormone on two occasions. Radomski said he and Gagne only spoke once (regarding how to get air out of a syringe) while Gagne was with Lo Duca. After that, according to Radomski, Lo Duca placed orders on Gagne’s behalf. Payment was made by through Lo duca once and directly from Gagne the other time. Both times shipments were sent directly to Gagne, once to Dodger Stadium and the other to Gagne’s home. The report cited an Express Mail receipt corroborating a 2004 delivery. Gagne’s name, address, and phone number were found in Radomski’s address book.

Mike Bell - Page 219 (267)

Bell was a customer of convicted Steroid Dealer, Kirk Radomski. As a current club employee, Bell was required to cooperate with the Mitchell Investigation. Bell admitted to using human growth hormone purchased from Radomski during the 2003 off-season. Bell said he had never used any other performance enhancing drugs (including HGH) on any other occasion. Bell’s name, address, and phone number were found in Radomski’s address book.

Matt Herges - Page 221 (269)

Herges was referred to Kirk Radomski by Paul Lo Duca according to Radomski though he says they never met in person. Radomski said he sold Herges human growth hormone 2 or 3 times in 2004 and 2005. Ivestigators found an Express Mail receipt and another undated shipping receipt both addressed to Herges were found by federal agents.

Gary Bennett, Jr. - Page 222 (270)

Bennett, Jr. was referred to Kirk Radomski by Denny Neagle according to Radomski. Radomski said he sold Bennett, Jr. two kits of human growth hormone on one occasion. Bennett, Jr.’s name, address, and phone number were found in Radomski’s address book.

Jim Parque - Page 223 (271)

Convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski, told Mitchell investigators that he sold Parque human growth hormone on two occasions in 2003. Radomski said that Parque sent him some Winstrol in 2003 for Radomski to “check out.” Radomski deemed the drugs “no good” and threw them out. Radomski produced two checks from Parque. Parque‘s name, address, and phone number were found in Radomski’s address book.

Brendan Donnelly - Page 224 (272)

Donnelly was referred to Kirk Radomski by Adam Riggs according to Radomski. Radomski said Donnelly contacted him looking for the anabolic steroid Anavar, instead Radomski reportedly sent the pitcher Deca-Durabolin (also an anabolic steroid).

Chad Allen - Page 225 (273)

Allen was referred to Kirk Radomski by Chris Donnels according to Radomski. Radomski said he sold anabolic steroids (Deca-Durabolin, Winstrol and testosterone) to Allen on at least 3 occasions. Radomski noted that Allen couldn’t afford human growth hormone. Allen spoke to Mitchell investigators and admitted to purchasing and using steroids (Winstrol) only once, after the 2003 season. Radomski produced one check from Allen. Radomski said the check was for ten vials of steroids while Allen said it was payment from an anti-estrogen drug used in conjunction with steroids. Radomski acknowledged that he sent Femara to Allen.

Jeff Williams - Page 227 (275)

Convicted steroid dealer, Kirk Radomski, told Mitchell investigators that he sold Williams anabolic steroids (Anavar and Dianabol) but didn’t say how many times or in what quantities. Radomski produced one check from Williams dated December 10, 2004. Williams’ name, address, and phone number were found in Radomski’s address book.

Howie Clark - Page 228 (276)

Clark was referred to Kirk Radomski by Larry Bigbie according to Radomski. According to the Mitchell report, Radomski sold Clark human growth hormone on four or five occasions. Radomski produced two money orders from Clark from April/May 2005

Nook Logan - Page 229 (277)

Logan was referred to Kirk Radomski by Rondell White according to Radomski. According to the Mitchell report, Radomski sold Logan one kit of human growth hormone just before federal agents raided his home. Radomski still had Logan’s phone number in his cell phone while he was interviewed by Mitchell investigators and provided that number.

Dan Naulty - Page 232 (280)

As part of the Mitchell investigator’s efforts to interview former players, they contacted Naulty. Naulty admitted using anabolic steroids “on and off” for seven years and human growth hormone for one in both the minor and major leagues beginning in 1993.

Admitted Steroid & HGH Users

Ken Caminiti May 2002

Admitted Using: Steroids (Non-specific)
What he said: In an interview with Tom Verducci for Sports Illustrated Magazine, Caminiti admitted to using steroids, beginning in 1996 while he was recovering from a shoulder injury. Caminiti was the first star player to admit to using steroids. Caminiti estimated that 50% of players were using performance-enhancing drugs. Caminiti's admission was published in a May 28, 2002 article entitled Caminiti Comes Clean.

Bobby Estalella December 2003

Admitted Using: Steroids (The Clear, The Cream), Human Growth Hormone
What he said: In his leaked BALCO Grand Jury testimony, Estalella admitted to using undetectable BALCO drugs and HGH provided by Greg Anderson. The fact that he had admitted his use was reported by the San Fransisco Chronicle in Dec. 2004. The details of his testimony were published in Game of Shadows in Feb. 2005.

Jason Giambi December 2003

Admitted Using: Steroids (The Clear, The Cream, Deca-Durabolin, Injectable Testosterone), Human Growth Hormone
What he said: Testifying before the Grand Jury, Giambi admitted to using undetectable BALCO drugs and injectable testosterone provided by Greg Anderson. He also said he used Deca-Durabolin and HGH he bought at a Gold’s Gym near Las Vegas. He testified that he used the BALCO drugs in 2002 and 2003, the Deca-Durabolin in 2001, and the HGH from 2001 to 2003. Giambi implied Bonds’ steroid use when he testified that he was drawn to Anderson because of Bonds' success. His confidential testimony was leaked to the San Fransisco Chronicle; excerpts were published in a Dec. 2, 2004 article entitled Giambi admitted taking steroids.

Jeremy Giambi December 2003

Admitted Using: Steroids (The Clear, The Cream, Deca-Durabolin, Injectable Testosterone), Human Growth Hormone
What he said: Testifying before the BALCO Grand Jury, Jeremy admitted to using BALCO drugs and the injectable testosterone obtained from Greg Anderson, as well as Deca-Durabolin previously. His testimony mirrored his brother Jason’s when describing the attraction to Greg Anderson and the details of which drugs were used and how. His confidential testimony was leaked to the San Fransisco Chronicle; excerpts were published in a Dec. 2, 2004 article entitled Giambi admitted taking steroids.

Armando Rios December 2003

Admitted Using: Steroids (The Clear, The Cream, Injectable Testosterone), Human Growth Hormone
What he said: In his leaked BALCO Grand Jury testimony, Rios admitted to using undetectable BALCO drugs and HGH provided by Greg Anderson. The fact that he had admitted his use was reported by the San Fransisco Chronicle in Dec. 2004. The details of his testimony were published in Game of Shadows in Feb. 2005.

Benito Santiago December 2003

Admitted Using: Steroids (The Clear, The Cream, Winstrol, Injectable Testosterone), Human Growth Hormone
What he said: During his testimony at the BALCO grand jury, Santiago admitted to using undetectable BALCO drugs as well as Winstrol and HGH provided by Greg Anderson. The fact that he had admitted his use was reported by the San Fransisco Chronicle in Dec. 2004. The details of his testimony were published in Game of Shadows in Feb. 2005.

Gary Sheffield December 2003

Admitted Using: Steroids (The Clear, The Cream, Andriol)
What he said: Sheffield testified before the BALCO grand jury that he had used the undetectable BALCO steroids and some ‘red beans’ which lawyers identified as Andriol. Sheffield said that the drugs were obtained directly from Bonds noting that Bonds’ trainer, Greg Anderson, was never involved. Sheffield’s confidential testimony was leaked to the San Fransisco Chronicle; excerpts were published in a Dec. 3, 2004 article entitled What Bonds told BALCO grand jury.

Jose Canseco February 2005

Admitted Using: Steroids (Deca-Durabolin, Winstrol, Equipose, Anavar), Human Growth Hormone
What he said: In February 2005 Canseco released his autobiography and steroid tell-all, Juiced, Wild Times, Rampant ‘Roids, Smash Hits, and How Baseball Got Big. In it he described himself as ‘the chemist’ having experimented on himself for years. He claimed to have educated and personally injected many players including Mark McGwire, Rafael Palmeiro, Juan Gonzalez, Ivan Rodriguez, and Jason Giambi.

Tom House May 2005

Admitted Using: Steroids (Non-specific)
What he said: In a telephone interview with San Fransisco Chronicle reporter, Ron Kroichick, House admitted to using steroids ‘for a couple of seasons’ during his career (1971-1978). House estimated that six or seven pitchers on every staff in baseball were experimenting with steroids in the 1970’s. This was, and still is, the earliest account of steroid use in baseball. House’s admission and comments are from a May 3, 2005 San Fransisco Chronicle article entitled House a 'failed experiment' with steroids.

Wally Joyner November 2005

Admitted Using: Steroids (Non-specific)
What he said: In an interview with ESPN’s Buster Olney, Joyner admitted to using steroids in 1997. He described how he had asked his friend, Ken Caminiti how he could get steroids. Caminiti gave him the phone number of a steroid dealer, and he later received steroid pills in the mail via Caminiti. Joyner admitted to taking just three pills before deciding to stop. Joyner’s admission was published in an ESPN special report entitled Who Knew?

Jim Leyritz June 2006

Admitted Using: Human Growth Hormone
What he said: In an interview with New York Post, Leyritz admitted to using HGH while recovering from surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff between the 2000 and 2001 seasons. He said he didn’t try steroids because his family had a history of prostate cancer. Leyritz’s admission was published in the June 10, 2006 New York Post article entitled Leyritz Admits he Used HGH.

Paxton Crawford June 2006

Admitted Using: Steroids (Deca-Durabolin, Winstrol), Human Growth Hormone
What he said: In an article by ESPN’s Amy K. Nelson, Crawford admitted to using steroids and HGH during the 2001-2003 season. Crawford said steroids ‘had a hold of the game’ and that players were ‘walking around like zombies.’ Crawford’s admission was published in the June 21, 2006 issue of ESPN The Magazine, in article entitled Why Pitchers Juice.

David Segui June 2006

Admitted Using: Human Growth Hormone
What he said: In an interview with ESPN's Jeremy Schaap, Segui admitted to being one of the redacted names from the Jason Grimsley Affidavit. Segui claims his HGH use was legal. His doctor deemed him HGH deficient and not only prescribed him the drugs but monitored his (blood) levels while he was using it. Segui’s admission was televised June. 18, 2006, as part of ESPN's Outside The Lines.

John Rocker March 2007

Admitted Using: Human Growth Hormone
The Story: Rocker received two prescriptions for Somatropin between April and July 2003 from Applied Pharmacy Services in Mobile, Alabama. Rocker admitted using human growth hormone he bought over-the-counter but denied receiving drugs or ever having a prescription from Applied Pharmacy.Rocker's name was revealed in a March 6, 2007 Sports Illustrated article entitled Inside the Steroid Sting.

Paul Byrd October 2007

Admitted Using: Human Growth Hormone(Somatropin)
The Story: Byrd received 13 prescriptions for (some for Somatropin) between August 2002 and January 2005 while a member of the Royals and Braves. from the Palm Beach Rejuvenation Center, an anti-aging clinic in Florida. Byrd claimed he had a legitimate growth hormone deficiency and that the HGH was used under "a doctor's care and supervision.' Byrd's name was revealed in a October 17, 2007 San Francisco Chronicle article entitled Cleveland Pitcher Spent Thousands on Human Growth Hormone.

Shane Monahan December 2007

Admitted Using: Steroids (Winstrol, Deca-Durabolin)
The Story: Monahan openly admitted to using anabolic steroids during his two stints with the Seattle Mariners in 1998 and 1999. In a candid interview, Monahan said he used steroids in an attempt to stay in the major leagues and to make more money. He also described the clubhouse culture with the Mariners at the time, telling ESPN's Mike Fish that players could get steroids and amphetamines from players' friends or employees in the clubhouse, and that nearly everyone used amphetamines. Monahan's admission was published in a December 28, 2007 ESPN article entitled Clubhouse culture led ex-Mariner to steroids and greenies.

Implicated Players

Mark McGwire May 1992

Reportedly Used: Steroids (Winstrol, Testosterone, Equipose)
The Story: During an FBI investigation codenamed ‘Operation Equine’ in 1992, officers turned up steroid dealer, Curtis Wenzlaff. Wenzlaff's training-session notes show he put McGwire on a mix of Winstrol V, testosterone and Equipoise. In Juiced, Jose Canseco claims to have personally injected McGwire with steroids. McGwire admitted using the Androstenedione found in his locker but it was not banned by MLB nor an illegal substance at the time.

Manny Alexander July 2000

Reportedly Used: Steroids (Non-specific)
The Story: Police found vials of steroids and syringes in the glove compartment of Alexander's Mercedes on June 30, 2000. Alexander had loaned the vehicle to team bat boy, Carlos Cowart, who has no license and a three-page criminal record and was driving the car when the steroids were found. Police found no evidence linking the steroids to Cowart who was described as ‘not a weightlifter or anything even remotely like that.. not even a beginning weightlifter.’ The New York Times later reported that Alexander's name was on the enveope that contained the steroids.

Chuck Finley May 2002

Reportedly Used: Steroids (Non-specific)
The Story: During divorce proceedings, Finley’s wife, Tawny Kitaen, in an official declaration, stated that Finley used steroids amongst other drugs during their marriage. She witnessed Finley injecting the steroids, and claimed that he bragged about being able ‘to get around drug testing’ in Major League Baseball.

Barry Bonds December 2003

Reportedly Used: Steroids (The Clear, The Cream)
What he said: Testifying before the BALCO Grand Jury, Bonds admitted to using two undetectable steroids from BALCO. He testified that he believed The Cream was an arthritis balm and the THG was flaxseed oil. Both substances were given to him by his friend and trainer, Greg Anderson. His confidential testimony was leaked to the San Fransisco Chronicle; excerpts were published in a Dec. 3, 2004 article entitled What Bonds told BALCO grand jury.

Marvin Bernard December 2003

Reportedly Used: Steroids (The Clear, The Cream)
The Story: BALCO court documents detailing IRS agent Jeff Novitzky’s interview with Greg Anderson, show that Anderson named Bernard as one of his ‘little guys’ using steroids and HGH. During the BALCO raid, vice president, Jim Valente told Novitzky that Bernard was one of many players receiving the undectable drugs, The Clear (THG) and The Cream.

Randy Velarde December 2003

Reportedly Used: Steroids (The Clear, The Cream)
The Story: IRS agent Jeff Novitzky found ‘paperwork’ tying several players including Velarde, to BALCO. Subsequently during the BALCO raid, vice president Jim Valente told Novitzky that Velarde was one of many players receiving the undetectable drugs, The Clear (THG) and The Cream.

Wilson Alvarez February 2005

Reportedly Used: Steroids (Non-specific), Human Growth Hormone
The Story: In Juiced, Jose Canseco claims to have educated and personally injected Alvarez with steroids. Canseco claims Alvarez wanted to lose weight and so he put him on human growth hormone (HGH) and a ‘lean cycle of steroids.’

Bret Boone February 2005

Reportedly Used: Steroids (Non-specific)
The Story: In Juiced, Jose Canseco describes an encounter at second base with Boone where Canseco comments about Boone’s physique to which Bonne replies ‘Shh, don’t tell anybody.’ Canseco calls him an ‘obvious’ user with a ‘small frame and huge arms’.

Ozzie Canseco February 2005

Reportedly Used: Steroids (Non-specific)
The Story: In Juiced, Jose Canseco confirms his brother Ozzie’s steroid use. Jose mentions it only in passing, and does not go into any detail.

Juan Gonzalez February 2005

Reportedly Used: Steroids (Deca-Durabolin and/or Winstrol, Testosterone), Human Growth Hormone
The Story: In 2001, Gonzalez' trainer, Angel Presinal was questioned by Canadian police when he picked up an unmarked bag containing anabolic steroids and Clenbuterol. He told the police that the bag belonged to Gonzalez, then with the Indians. Four years later, in Juiced, Jose Canseco claims to have educated Gonzalez, along with Rafael Palmeiro and Ivan Rodriguez, about steroids when they were teammates in Texas (1992-1994). He subsequently claims to have acquired steroids on behalf of all three before personally injecting each of them ‘many times.’ Canseco says all three used a combination of HGH and steroids (Deca-Durabolin and/or Winstrol) and ‘a small dose’ of injectable testosterone.

Dave Martinez February 2005

Reportedly Used: Steroids (Non-specific)
The Story: In Juiced, Jose Canseco claims to have educated and personally injected Martinez with steroids. Canseco implicates Martinez to show that it’s not only sluggers who use steroids.

Ivan Rodriguez February 2005

Reportedly Used: Steroids (Deca-Durabolin and/or Winstrol, Testosterone), Human Growth Hormone
The Story: In Juiced, Jose Canseco claims to have educated Rodriguez, along with Rafael Palmeiro and Juan Gonzalez, about steroids when they were teammates in Texas. He subsequently claims to have acquired steroids on behalf of all three before personally injecting each of them ‘many times.’ Canseco says all three used a combination of HGH and steroids (Deca-Durabolin and/or Winstrol) and ‘a small dose’ of injectable testosterone.

Tony Saunders February 2005

Reportedly Used: Steroids (Non-specific), Human Growth Hormone
The Story: In Juiced, Jose Canseco describes intimate conversations with Saunders about his dosages of steroids and his use of HGH. Canseco even claims to warned Saunders to ‘dose that stuff down’ before Saunders broke his arm throwing a pitch in 1999.

Miguel Tejada February 2005

Reportedly Used: Steroids
The Story: Rafael Palmeiro said his positive test for Stanozolol may have been caused by a tainted B12 shot he got from Tejada. In Juiced Jose Canseco said he educated Tejada about the benefits of steroids. In the Mitchell Report, Adam Piatt said he purchased HGH and testosterone for Tejada in 2003.

Lenny Dykstra April 2005

Reportedly Used: Steroids (Deca-Durabolin), Human Growth Hormone
The Story: Former business partner Lindsay Jones sued Dykstra over an ownership stake in a car wash business. In the suit Jones claimed that Dykstra used steroids and gambled on major league games (though Dykstra never received the profits). The suit contained a sworn statement from bodybuilder and convicted steroid dealer, Jeff Scott, who later said he injected Dykstra with steroids ‘more times than I can count.’ The details of the civil suit were published in a Apr. 24, 2005 Los Angeles Times article entitled Fingering 'Nails.'

Dave Hollins April 2005

Reportedly Used: Steroids (Non-specific)
The Story: Bodybuilder, Jeff Scott claims Hollins visited him frequently and asked about steroids while trying to gain weight after learning he had diabetes in 1993. Hollins denies ever being to Scotts apartment, but Scott, as well as another unnamed source both claim that Hollins was there often.

Roger Clemens October 2006

Reportedly Used: ‘Performance-Enhancing Drugs’
The Story: Clemens was one of the redacted names from the Jason Grimsley Affidavit. In the affidavit, Grimsley told investigators he obtained amphetamines, anabolic steroids and HGH from a person recommended to him by, Brian McNamee strength and conditioning coach of Clemens and Andy Pettitte. Grimsley later named Clemens specifically as a user of ‘performance-enhancing drugs.’ Clemens’ name was revealed in an Oct. 1, 2006 Los Angeles Times Article entitled Clemens Is Named in Drug Affidavit.

Andy Pettitte October 2006

Reportedly Used: ‘Performance-Enhancing Drugs’
The Story: Pettitte was one of the redacted names from the Jason Grimsley Affidavit. In the affidavit, Grimsley told investigators he obtained amphetamines, anabolic steroids and HGH from a person recommended to him by Brian McNamee, strength and conditioning coach of Pettitte and Roger Clemens. Grimsley later named Pettitte specifically as a user of ‘performance-enhancing drugs.’ Pettitte’s name was revealed in an Oct. 1, 2006 Los Angeles Times Article entitled Clemens Is Named in Drug Affidavit.

Brian Roberts October 2006

Reportedly Used: Steroids (Non-specific)
The Story: Roberts was one of the redacted names from the Affidavit filed by IRS Agent Jeff Novitzky describing Jason Grimsley’s admission of his steroid use and that of others. Grimsley said specifically that Roberts, Miguel Tejada and Jay Gibbons used ‘anabolic steroids.’ Roberts’ name was revealed in an Oct. 1, 2006 Los Angeles Times Article entitled Clemens Is Named in Drug Affidavit.

Jay Gibbons October 2006

Reportedly Used: Steroids (Non-specific)
The Story: Gibbons was one of the redacted names from the Affidavit filed by IRS Agent Jeff Novitzky describing Jason Grimsley’s performance-enhancing drug use by himself and others. Grimsley said specifically that Gibbons, Miguel Tejada and Brian Roberts used ‘anabolic steroids.’ Roberts’ name was revealed in an Oct. 1, 2006 Los Angeles Times Article entitled Clemens Is Named in Drug Affidavit.

Gary Matthews Jr. February 2007

Reportedly Used: Human Growth Hormone (Genotropin)
The Story: Matthews' name came up as a customer of Applied Pharmacy Services in Mobile Alabama when the pharmacy was busted for selling steroids and human growth hormone over the internet prescribed in illegal ways. Matthews Jr.’s name was revealed in an Feb. 27, 2007 Albany Times Union article entitled Albany DA raids Fla. steroids center.

Jerry Hairston Jr. March 2007

Reportedly Used: Human Growth Hormone (Genotropin)
The Story: Hairston Jr. reportedly ordered at least two shipments of human growth hormone beginning in 2004 from Applied Pharmacy Services in Mobile, Alabama. Hairston Jr.’s name was revealed in a Mar. 2, 2007 Sports Illustrated article entitled Documents: Hairston received HGH.

Darren Holmes March 2007

Reportedly Used: Human Growth Hormone (Genotropin) and Testosterone
The Story: Holmes ordered and received Human Growth Hormone from Applied Pharmacy Servies in October 2003. Holmes said the HGH arrived with unsolicited testosterone which made him suspicious. He claims to have never used any of the drugs he received. Holmes' name was revealed in a Mar. 8, 2007 Sports Illustrated article entitled Updates on the Steroid Sting.

Rick Ankiel September 2007

Reportedly Used: Human Growth Hormone (Saizen and Genotropin)
The Story: Ankiel received Human Growth Hormone from Signature Pharmacy through The Health and Rejuvenation Center (THARC) in Palm Beach, Florida in 2004, just before HGH was banned by Major League Baseball. Ankiel's name was revealed in a September 7, 2007 New York Daily News article entitled Rick Ankiel received 12-month supply of HGH, News learns.

Troy Glaus September 2007

Reportedly Used: Anabolic Steroids (Nandrolone and Testosterone)
The Story: Glaus ordered and received anabolic steroids from Signature Pharmacy through New Hope Health Center based in California between September 2003 and May 2004, both substances were banned by Major League Baseball at the time. Glaus's name was revealed in a September 7, 2007 Sports Illustrated article entitled Source: Glaus received steroids.

Scott Schoeneweis October 2007

Reportedly Used: Anabolic Steroids (Stanozolol and Testosterone)
The Story: Schoeneweis reportedly received anabolic steroids from Signature Pharmacy through New Hope Health Center based in California between May 2003 and June 2004, both substances were banned by Major League Baseball at the time. Schoeneweis' name was revealed in a September 7, 2007 Sports Illustrated article entitled Source: Schoeneweis received 'roids; lefty denies it.

Matt Williams November 2007

Reportedly Used: Anabolic Steroids (Nandrolone and Testosterone Cypionate) HGH, Clomiphene, Novarel
The Story: Williams reportedly received over $16 000 worth of anabolic steroids and HGH among other drugs from Palm Beach Rejuvenation Center between March 2002 and sometime in 2005. Williams received two shipments of HGH after he retired in 2003. Williams' name was revealed in a November 8, 2007 San Francisco Chronicle article entitled Baseball's Jose Guillen, Matt Williams Bought Steroids from Clinic.

Jose Guillen November 2007

Reportedly Used: Anabolic Steroids (Nandrolone, Testosterone Cypionate, Testosterone Propionate, Stanozolol) HGH (Genotropin), Clomiphene, Novarel
The Story: Guillen reportedly received over $19 000 worth of anabolic steroids and HGH among other drugs from Palm Beach Rejuvenation Center between May 2002 and June 2005. Guillen received at least two shipments of steroids after they were banned and tested for by Major League Baseball. Guillen's prescriptions were written by the same dentist who prescribed drugs to Byrd, Guillen and Williams. Guillen's name was revealed in a November 8, 2007 San Francisco Chronicle article entitled Baseball's Jose Guillen, Matt Williams Bought Steroids from Clinic.

Ismael Valdez November 2007

Reportedly Used: HGH (inknown), Clomiphene, Novarel, Arimide
The Story: Valdez reportedly received HGH among other drugs from Palm Beach Rejuvenation Center in 2002 while a member of the Seattle Mariners. Valdez received over $11 000 worth of performance-enhancing drugs that season. Valdez's prescriptions were written by the same dentist who prescribed drugs to Byrd, Guillen and Williams. Guillen's name was revealed in a November 8, 2007 San Francisco Chronicle article entitled Baseball's Jose Guillen, Matt Williams Bought Steroids from Clinic.

Magglio Ordonez January 2008

Reportedly Used: Unknown
The Story: According to reports, Jose Canseco wanted Magglio Ordonez to invest in a movie project in exchange for not naming him in Canseco's second book, Vindicated. Canseco was reportedly trying to raise funds for a documentary based on his first book, Juiced. The matter was referred to the FBI by Major League Baseball and Ordonez's agent, Scott Boras. Ordonez chose not to pursue any legal action. Ordonez's name was revealed in a January 24, 2008 New York Times article entitled Canseco Is Said to Seek Favor to Omit Name.

Alex Rodriguez March 2009

Reportedly Used: Unknown
The Story: In Jose Canseco's second book, Vindicated, Canseco claims to have introduced Rodriguez to a trainer/steroid dealer. Canseco refused to name the trainer saying only "the timing is not right," and saying he would wait and see if Rodriguez called him a liar. Rodriguez's name was revealed in Canseco's book, Vindicated: Big Names, Big Liars, and the Battle to Save Baseball.

Mike Piazza March 2009

Reportedly Used: Unknown
The Story: Piazza reportedly admitted that he used performance enhancing drugs to at least one unnamed reporter. Long rumored to have used steroids, at least two former players were quoted as saying they were sure that Piazza used. Former New York Times reporter, Murray Chass, said that he had been aware of Piazza's severe back acne (a common side-effect of using steroids) and that it cleared up in 2004 when MLB instituted its first testing program with penalties. Piazza was named most significantly in Jeff Pearlman's book, The Rocket That Fell To Earth.

Todd Greene April 2009

Reportedly Used: Steroids
The Story: Greene reportedly used steroids prescribed to him by Dr. Ramon Scruggs, and "anti-aging doctor" under investigation by federal authorities since 2007. Greene reportedly told investigators that he was at a "critical point" in his career and was worried that he wouldn't be able to provide for his family. Greene was named in Michael Schmidt's New York Times article, Risk, Reward, Steroids: Inside a Tempting World of Easy Steroids.

Sammy Sosa June 2009

Reportedly Used: Unknown
The Story: According to the New York Times, Sammy Sosa was one of 104 players that tested positive for a performance enhancing drugs during Major League Baseball's 2003 survey testing. The Times cited "lawyers with knowledge of the drug-testing results" but said they did not know for which drug Sosa had tested positive.Sosa was first implicated in Michael Schmidt's New York Times article, Sosa Is Said to Test Positive in 2003.

David Ortiz July 2009

Reportedly Used: Unknown
The Story: According to the New York Times, David Ortiz tested positive for steroids during Major League Baseball's 2003 survey testing. The Times cited "lawyers with knowledge of the results" but did not disclose for which drug Sosa had tested positive. Ortiz was first implicated in Michael Schmidt's New York Times article, Ortiz and Ramirez Said to Be on 2003 Doping List.

MLB Positive Tests / Suspensions

Alex Sánchez April 3, 2005

Tested Positive For: Unknown
Comments: "I'm going to fight it, because I've never taken steroids or anything like that. I know I did nothing incorrect.. I take stuff I buy over the counter. Multivitamins, protein shakes, muscle relaxants, that kind of stuff."

Jorge Piedra April 11, 2005

Tested Positive For: Unknown
Comments: "It is what it is. In the offseason, I had a few injuries and I took some pills. I didn't know the ingredients would make me test positive, but here I am.. I apologize to my family and the Rockies. It happened to me, but I embarrassed them."

Agustin Montero April 20, 2005

Tested Positive For: Unknown
Comments: None

Jamal Strong April 26, 2005

Tested Positive For: Unknown
Comments: None

Juan Rincon May 2, 2005

Tested Positive For: Unknown
Comments: “The details are confidential, and I have asked the players' association to challenge the suspension.. I would never knowingly compromise my position within Major League Baseball or jeopardize my relationship with the Minnesota Twins organization or the relationships that I enjoy with my teammates.”

Rafael Betancourt July 8, 2005

Tested Positive For: Unknown
Comments: "I am very angry and disappointed with Major League Baseball's decision to suspend me. I am going to file a grievance to clear my name. I am very sorry if this has caused any embarrassment and I apologize to my family, the Cleveland Indians organization, my teammates and all the fans.”

Rafael Palmeiro August 1, 2005

Tested Positive For: Stanzolol (Anabolic Steroid)
Comments: "I have never intentionally used steroids. Never. Ever. Period."

Ryan Franklin August 2, 2005

Tested Positive For: Unknown
Comments: "There's got to be a flaw in the system. I have no clue. I tested in [early] May and again three weeks later. The first was positive, the second was negative."

Mike Morse September 7, 2005

Tested Positive For: Unknown
Comments: "In May 2004, I was punished and suspended, which I deserved, for my mistake. I embarrassed myself, my family and my team. I am responsible for the mistake of taking steroids and the positive result was not due to some over-the-counter supplement, protein shake or tainted test.. I am troubled that I will be suspended for the third time despite the fact that the scientific evidence supports that I kept my promise that I would never use steroids again."

Carlos Almanzar October 4, 2005

Tested Positive For: Unknown
Comments: None

Felix Heredia October 18, 2005

Tested Positive For: Unknown
Comments: None

Matt Lawton November 2, 2005

Tested Positive For: Boldenone Undecylenate (Anabolic Steroid)
Comments: "I made a terrible and foolish mistake that I will regret for the rest of my life. I take full responsibility for my actions and did not appeal my suspension. I apologize to the fans, the game, my family and all those people that I let down. I am truly sorry and deeply regret my terrible lapse in judgment."

Yusaku Iriki April 28, 2006

Tested Positive For: Unknown
Comments: None

Jason Grimsley June 2006

Admitted Using: Steroids (Deca-Durabolin), Prohormones (1-AD), Human Growth Hormone
What he said: In an IRS affidavit, Grimsley says he used steroids throughout his 15 year career, but had used only HGH since MLB instituted its drug testing program in 2004. Grimsley named other players who were users though the names were redacted. David Segui later admitted to being one of the redacted names. Grimsley’s admission was released in an affidavit of IRS agent Jeff Novitzky.

Guillermo Mota Nov. 1, 2006

Tested Positive For: Unknown
Comments: "I have no one to blame but myself. I take full responsibility for my actions and accept MLB's suspension. I used extremely poor judgment and deserve to be held accountable."

Juan Salas May 7, 2007

Tested Positive For: Unknown
Comments: None

Ryan Jorgensen September 7, 2007

Linked To: Unknown
The Story: According to the Mitchell Report, Jorgensen was suspended 50 games by Major League Baseball "based on non-analytic evidence that he had violated the joint program."

Dan Serafini November 27, 2007

Tested Positive For: Unknown
Comments: "While trying to accelerate the healing process of these injuries, I took substances that were prescribed for me by a doctor in Japan. What I did not know at the time was that these substances would cause me to test positive once I returned to the U.S."

Eliezer Alfonzo April 30, 2008

Tested Positive For: Unknown
Comments: "I made a mistake, and I want to apologize to my family, my teammates, the fans and the Giants organization. I know what I did was wrong, and now I will pay the penalty. As a father, I now have to look my children in the eye and explain to them that I have made a big mistake, one, unfortunately, that they are also going to have to deal with, as well as me."

Humberto Cota May 28, 2008

Tested Positive For: Unknown
Comments: "I want to make it clear that I did not use any banned substances in order to improve my performance. In July 2007, I had season-ending surgery performed on my left shoulder. During this past winter, while I was a free agent, my shoulder was slow to heal. I took substances that were prescribed for me by a doctor in Mexico."

Henry Owens November 11, 2008

Tested Positive For: Unknown
Comments: None

JC Romero January 6, 2009

Tested Positive For: Androstenedione
Comments: "I still cannot see where I did something wrong. There is nothing that should take away from the rings of my teammates. I didn't cheat. I tried to follow the rules."

Sergio Mitre January 6, 2009

Tested Positive For: Androstenedione
Comments: "Although being suspended for 50 games is tough to accept, I think that it is important to understand that I am in full support of drug testing in baseball… I did take the supplement in question and accept full responsibility for taking it. What has been difficult for me to understand is that I legally purchased this supplement at GNC and had no intention nor desire to cheat or to circumvent the system in any way. "

Kelvin Pichardo March 23, 2009

Tested Positive For: Unknown
Comments: None

Manny Ramirez May 7, 2009

Tested Positive For: HCG
Comments: Recently I saw a physician for a personal health issue. He gave me a medication, not a steroid, which he thought was OK to give me. Unfortunately, the medication was banned under our drug policy. Under the policy that mistake is now my responsibility. I have been advised not to say anything more for now. I do want to say one other thing; I've taken and passed about 15 drug tests over the past five seasons. I want to apologize to Mr. McCourt, Mrs. McCourt, Mr. Torre, my teammates, the Dodger organization, and to the Dodger fans. LA is a special place to me and I know everybody is disappointed. So am I. I'm sorry about this whole situation.

Edinson Volquez April 20, 2010

Tested Positive For: Clomiphene
Comments: "Prior to the conclusion of last season, my wife and I sought medical advice in Cincinnati with the hope of starting a family… As part of my consultation with the physician, I received certain prescribed medications to treat my condition. As a follow up to our original consultation, my wife and I visited another physician in our home city in the Dominican Republic this past off-season. This physician also gave me certain prescribed medications as part of my treatment. Unfortunately, I now know that the medication the physician in the Dominican gave me is one that is often used to treat my condition, but is also a banned substance under Major League Baseball's drug policy. As a result, I tested positive when I reported to Spring Training."

Ronny Paulino August 20, 2010

Tested Positive For: Unknown
Comments: "To control my weight this season, I used a dietary pill. I recently learned that the dietary pill contained a substance banned under Major League Baseball's drug policy. I am ashamed and saddened for disappointing and distracting my family, my teammates, the entire Florida Marlins organization and baseball fans."

Other

Terrmel Sledge January 2004 (Olympics)

Linked To: Androstenedione Derivative (Prohormone)
The Story: Sledge tested positive for a steroid precursor while trying out for the 2004 US Olympic team and was banned from international competition for two years. Andro was legal and not banned by Major League Basbeall at the time.

Derek Turnbow January 2004 (Olympics)

Linked To: Androstenedione Derivative (Prohormone)
The Story: Turnbow tested positive for a steroid precursor while trying out for the 2004 US Olympic team. He said, "What happened is bad publicity. But it had nothing to do with Major League Baseball. I stepped across a line and volunteered for USA Baseball. I never would have failed a drug test if I hadn't volunteered for USA Baseball." Andro was legal and not banned by Major League Basbeall at the time.

Rico Brogna November 2005

Linked To: Androstenedione Derivative (Prohormone)
The Story: As part of ESPN's E-Ticket, Who Knew?, Brogna described his use of androstenedione. Brogna said he began taking it in 1997, adding 15 pounds of muscle and having a career year. Brogna's body started to break down and he considered using steroids but decided against it citing his fear of needles.

David Bell March 2007

Reportedly Used: Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG)
The Story: Bell ordered and received Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) from Applied Pharmacy in April 2006. Bell said the hCG was for a 'medical condition' which he declined to disclose. Bell's name was revealed in a Mar. 6, 2007 Sports Illustrated article entitled Inside the Steroid Sting.

 
The List
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Suspended for non-analytical evidence that player violated MLB drug policy.
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